• Topic > When Life Hurts > Abuse >

    A War Of Words

    On July 28, 1914, Austria-Hungary declared war on Serbia in response to the assassination of Archduke Francis Ferdinand and his wife, Sophie. Within 90 days, other European countries had taken sides to honor their military alliances and pursue their own ambitions. A single event escalated into World War I, one of the most destructive military conflicts of modern time.

    Lateral Violence

    An intriguing article in Michigan Nurse magazine called attention to “nursing’s dirty little secret”—the incivility and verbal abuse that occurs among some nurses. This peer-level bullying (also known as lateral violence) takes the form of back-stabbing, innuendo, infighting, sabotage, verbal affronts, failure to respect privacy, and others.

    When Words Hurt

    The destructive power of words can be a crushing force in a marriage—or in any relationship. In this booklet, counselor Jeff Olson helps you get a better understanding of the way words can be used as an instrument of building up or a weapon of tearing down. Find out how you can overcome the pain of verbal abuse and diffuse conflict in your relationship as you explore the power of words between husbands and wives.

    How To Identify A Dangerous Religious Group

    Many groups have masked their identity behind religion, offering a spiritual solution to attract those who are searching for answers in life. Author Mart De Haan shares wisdom from Scripture and insights from the experiences of someone who walked the descending staircase of a dangerous religious

    When Violence Comes Home: Help For Victims Of Spouse Abuse

    Spousal abuse is one of the most rapidly growing problems in our culture today—even within the church. Gain insight into the causes and effects of marital abuse and find out how you can respond with godly intervention, as co-authors Tim Jackson and Jeff Olson offer help for both victims and offenders.

    How the church can support those dealing with abuse in the home

    We live in a fallen world. And Christian homes aren’t immune to abuse and suffering. Let's wrestle with the difficult subject of domestic abuse and how the church can help those dealing with it.

    Biblical wisdom and hope for struggling relationships

    Misapplying a biblical text can lead to dangerous consequences. We must realize that how we handle Scripture can have bad results if we misapply it.

    Look at God’s ultimate design for marriage and find encouragement in the Scriptures

    “Submitting to one another in the fear of God. Wives, to your own husbands, as to the Lord. For the husband is head of the wife, as also Christ is head of the church; and He is the Savior of the body.Therefore, just as the church is subject to Christ, so let the wives be to their own husbands in everything. Husbands, love your wives just as Christ also loved the church and gave Himself for it, that he might sanctify and cleanse it with the washing of water by the word, that He might present it to Himself a glorious church, not having spot or wrinkle or any such thing, but that it should be holy and without blemish. So husbands ought to love their own wives as their own bodies; he who loves his wife loves himself. For no one ever hated his own flesh, but nourishes and cherishes it, just as the Lord does the church. For we are members of His body, of His flesh, and of His bones. For this reason a man shall leave his father and mother and be joined to his wife, and the two shall become one flesh. This is a great mystery, but I speak concerning Christ and the church. Nevertheless let each one of you in particular so love his own wife as himself, and let the wife see that she respects her husband” (Ephesians 5:21-33).

    Bringing clarity to the sensitive subject of submission in marriage

    Friday, July 6, 2012

    “Submitting to one another in the fear of God. Wives, to your own husbands, as to the Lord. For the husband is head of the wife, as also Christ is head of the church; and He is the Savior of the body. Therefore, just as the church is subject to Christ, so let the wives be to their own husbands in everything. Husbands, love your wives just as Christ also loved the church and gave Himself for it, that he might sanctify and cleanse it with the washing of water by the word, that He might present it to Himself a glorious church, not having spot or wrinkle or any such thing, but that it should be holy and without blemish. So husbands ought to love their own wives as their own bodies; he who loves his wife loves himself. For no one ever hated his own flesh, but nourishes and cherishes it, just as the Lord does the church. For we are members of His body, of His flesh, and of His bones. For this reason a man shall leave his father and mother and be joined to his wife, and the two shall become one flesh. This is a great mystery, but I speak concerning Christ and the church. Nevertheless let each one of you in particular so love his own wife as himself, and let the wife see that she respects her husband” (Ephesians 5:21-33).

    IDEA: How we interpret the Bible or apply the Bible can have serious consequences.

    PURPOSE: To help listeners realize that how we apply the Bible can have serious consequences.

    Mouth Guard

    I was walking in a subway in Minsk, Belarus, with my friend Yuliya and her daughter Anastasia when I suddenly fell face first onto the dirty concrete floor. I don’t remember the fall, but I do remember suddenly having a mouth filled with sand, gravel, and grit. Ugh! I couldn’t get that stuff out of my mouth quickly enough!

    Whispering Gallery

    London’s domed St. Paul’s Cathedral has an interesting architectural phenomenon called the “whispering gallery.” One Web site explains it this way: “The name comes from the fact that a person who whispers facing the wall on one side can be clearly heard on the other, since the sound is carried perfectly around the vast curve of the Dome.”

    Toxic Look-Alikes

    Our yard makes poison ivy happy. I learned this the hard way. Even though I was being careful, I came in contact with the plant and ended up with a nasty, itchy rash.

    Poison ivy looks like many harmless plants, and it keeps company with some beautiful ones.

    We use cookies to offer you a better browsing experience, by continuing to use this site you agree to this. Find out more on how we use cookies and how to disable them.